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Thanks a lot, Mom!

In thinking about how digital media influences lives and ultimately culture, I think there is an interesting new phenomenon that is going to be something that a lot of future adolescents and adults are going to have to deal with in some way or another: the renlentless blogging that their parents did about them as babies and children.

I keep up with about 90 blogs daily, a good handful of them being young parents of babies through pre-teens. One thing is abundantly clear - these parents love to blog about everything that happens with their children, plus post loads of pictures. These children's lives are being put on worldwide broadcast. This makes me wonder what the lifespan of many of these blogs will be and how much of this information will still be available as these children move into the teen, college, and adult years. How will they perceive all this? How will their peers handle it? In what ways will it be prized or hidden? Will these children appreciate the detailed accounts of their parents' trials, joys, and anecdotes regarding them as children? Will it even be an issue at all?

Guess I'll have to have some patience on this one.


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Blogger Jessica - 8:20 AM

I still don't let my husband watch videos from Girl Scout camp when I was 9, or goofball videos of my friends and I at a slumber party, or see pictures from any point in my sophomore year when I'd cut my own bangs.

To think it might be uploaded on a blog for him to see--we may never have gotten married. I think for some parents it's better than shining a shotgun on the front porch.

"Be home by 11, or I'll show him your mom's blog."

I bet there wouldn't be much sneaking out or staying past curfew with that threat.    



Blogger Pam - 8:47 PM

As a mom who posts stuff about her kids... at least it shows we care about them. We want to talk about them, and how proud we are of them. Is it so bad if one day they look back and see how we struggled with decisions for their well-being? How it's not easy being a parent? Or how much fun we had with them?

So, needless to say, I will keep posting about my kids. Why? Because I love them, I'm proud of them, and I want to show them off. By posting funny little stories of crazy things they do, maybe I'm inadvertently giving another parent a boost by letting them know it happens to all of us.

On another note... if people don't like reading about my kids... THEY DON'T HAVE TO.

Now I'm off my soapbox. :)    



Blogger not so zen momma - 7:23 PM

I liken "mommy blogging" to a lazy person's scrapbooking habit. Now I don't have to invest in scissors that cut weird scallops on the edge of my pictures. I rock!    



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